Give help for today and hope for tomorrow this Christmas


The responsibility is on us to push forward research that provides hope to the next generation of people affected by epilepsy. To do this we must attract and inspire the next generation of researchers to the field of epilepsy to speed up innovations in prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

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A personal message from our President, Professor J Helen Cross OBE

Every day, as a Paediatric Neurologist, I witness the devastation and lifelong impact epilepsy can have on children and their families. For children, we know that getting a diagnosis as early as possible is crucial to their brain development, but unfortunately this is not always straightforward.

As a result, families find themselves propelled into a world of appointments, tests and sometimes highly invasive procedures whilst navigating their own anxieties around the uncertain future of their small child. Children like Archer…

Epilepsy interrupted a crucial development stage for our son Archer. It took time away from him when he should have been safe at home with his twin sister, but instead he was in hospital. His little body has been through so much and it’s been heartbreaking to watch our tiny baby go through this.

Amanda, Archer’s mum

Sadly, stories like Archer’s are not unique. The responsibility is therefore on us to push forward research that will provide hope to the next generation of people affected by epilepsy. To do this we must attract and inspire the next generation of scientists to the field of epilepsy research to speed up innovations in prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Researchers like Dr Gashirai Mbizvo…

Dr Gash is a dynamic and dedicated early-career clinical researcher who has had a major impact on health practice and policy. Funded by Epilepsy Research UK, his fellowship studied the rates, causes and risk factors of adult epilepsy-related deaths in Scotland, and revealed that almost 80% of these deaths were avoidable. This study won several awards and the findings resulted in Dr Gash being invited to present at Scottish Parliament. He has gone on to play a key role in the development of clinical policy by making recommendations on reducing epilepsy-related deaths.

It is essential that our community funds and supports committed and ambitious researchers like Dr Gash. His work is an example of the impact that is possible and of the lifelong commitment he has made as a specialist registrar in neurology to the next generation of people affected by epilepsy. We need people like Dr Gash working on our biggest challenges.

Epilepsy is chronically underfunded – to do better for babies like Archer, we must invest today in the next generation of research and researchers. We must safeguard Archer’s future and give him the same opportunities his twin sister will have. And we must provide hope to parents like Amanda and John that we, as a community, are doing all we can to create a better future for the next generation.

As Amanda says, “The next generation of researchers could stop Archer’s life being interrupted by epilepsy – and many other babies and children like him.”

This Christmas, you can do this by making a donation today. Only through our powerful community working together will we STOP epilepsy interrupting lives.

With best wishes

Professor J Helen Cross OBE
President, Epilepsy Research UK
The Prince of Wales’s Chair of Childhood Epilepsy,
Great Ormond Street Hospital

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Your funding could help support current Epilepsy Research UK projects such as…

Epilepsy Research UK &
Young Epilepsy Fellowship

Tim is developing a sensor for a wearable brain scanner that accurately measures activity produced by epilepsy, while also being usable in a normal hospital ward or residential setting. ‘Bedside brain imaging’ could vastly improve diagnosis.

Epilepsy Research UK &
Autistica Fellowship

Charlotte is measuring behavioural and brain development in children with epilepsy and autism. The team are using cutting edge technology that enables tests to be completed in the home, to reduce the burden on families.

Epilepsy Research UK 
Emerging Leader Fellowship

Gareth is designing a new control mechanism for gene therapy that is only switched on when certain molecules are present during seizures. This new technique could hugely refine how we treat temporal lobe epilepsy and other drug-resistant epilepsies.